Algarve Entrances

The entrances to many places across the Algarve are inviting, artistic and visually appealing, whether they are public buildings or private ones. In some cases the doorways are old and covered in a patina of paint, dust and other grunge. But mostly I find people simply ‘do up’ their entrances to entice and appeal, to draw you in either for a closer look or to buy. Then again, it may simply be because the owners want to give themselves the pleasure of arriving at a lovely, enticing entrance to their abode or place of work.

Here are a few of the spots that call to me.

1.  A lush, elegant water entrance

A lush, elegant water entrance

Right next to the Roman Bridge in central Tavira there is a row of townhouses, each of which has access to the tidal Rio Gilão. This one is particularly lush with huge succulent plants draping off the balustrade towards the water.
Each time I visit, I love to imagine a boat pulled up to the lowest step and an elegant woman making her way with aplomb from the small boat onto the even steps. I equally know that if it were me, I’d probably miss the step and drop like a stone into the river! But my mystical lady never does. She is graceful, accurate and dry each time she steps off the bobbing boat. What would your fantasy be about arriving by boat at these lovely stairs?

Patiently waiting for a friend

2.  Doggy dressed up door stoops

Don’t know what it is about the Algarve, but people sure do love their pooches. Sadly, far too many are ultimately abandoned to wander the streets. But there are a lot of lucky pooches who simply wait for their owner to arrive home, faithful and hopeful that company will arrive soon.

Another sweet little mutt

These are two of my favourite little dogs, each clearly anxious for company. Makes me wonder what it would be like to have such a greeting each time I come home. . . . And I’m not even much of a pet person! But who could fail to love these charming little faces.

 

 

3.  Portuguese cemeteries are walled in

Explore the local cemetery

When you drive by a Portuguese community and see a large, walled-in enclosure you are likely walking or driving by the local cemetery. Public cemeteries in Portugal began to be established in the 19th century and their current form has developed since then. Cemeteries at that time became a place where wealthy families could display not only their wealth, but their culture and commitment to the arts.

So it is always exciting to find the cemetery entrance and either sneak a peak inside or go in for a ramble around. You’ll be certain to find a combination of grave-sites with ornate headstones and marble enclosures as well as masoleums containing generations of deceased family members. These small buildings are often ornately decorated and carved, containing lots of wrought iron fittings, stained glass, stone carvings and gleaming brass, lace and linen interior trim.

More recent additions are plain, rectangular ‘high rises’ filled with small lockers for individual coffins. They certainly add very little esthetic value to the cemeteries but clearly are an efficient way to deal inexpensively with a large number of deceased. People dress these little ‘bird cages’ up in imaginative and often highly tacky ways. And yet the overall effect is one of life and vitality.

Do stop and take a peek. I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised at what you can learn about a people in the way they bury and honour their deceased.

4.  My favourite hotel has a lovely entry way to its pool

What mystery awaits through this portal?

No matter how many times I walk past the entrance to the pool at Hotel Vilas D’Agua, I always enjoy the view of the ocean it presents, as well as knowing that a lovely, serene swimming pool is just out of view.

The modern, square arch contrasts with the traditional cobblestoned walkway. And the blast of bright white plaster against a cerulean blue sky seems to only add to the delight I experience.

I know there is a pool on the other side of this entrance, but to me it feels like a magical portal. You know, one of those entrances where you can make up a great story about what awaits you on the other side. What would your story be?

5.  How could you not be tempted by a restaurant entrance like this?

What an Invitation

I love to visit my friends Stefan and Lisa at Restaurante Rouxinol, just outside the Caldas de Monchique. Partly it is because I love the drive up into the mountains. Mostly it is because of the friendly welcome and great food and hospitality I know always await me.

But this entrance! Who wouldn’t be tempted upward to the patio by such a welcoming entrance way. It is a tight turn off the main road into Restaurante Rouxinol’s driveway, but as I leave my car and walk towards this inviting stairway I know that I will be well received. Each visit there are different flowers in bloom and sometimes the lemon and orange trees are in fruit. Other times the banana plants are bursting with lushness. You just never know. What I am certain of is a huge grin from both Stefan and Lisa, a bear hug and an invitation to sit, to enjoy, to refresh myself and to catch up. Now that is a special treat!

Algarve’s Gentle Eastern Shores

I recently spent two more glorious weeks in the Algarve.  Only this time, I moved east, staying in the delightful town of Tavira.  My days were spent exploring the town, the back country, the waterfront and, of course, the many fine dining opportunities that abound in the Algarve.  Off-the-beaten track Algarve continues to be what calls to me.  This recent trip helped confirm, yet again, just how much diversity is packed into this tiny region of wonderful vistas, friendly, gentle people, great food and culture, fabulous beaches and good shopping.

Sunset near Tavira

The coastline feels more gentle because you are pretty much behind the barrier islands of the Rio Formosa in this part of the world.  Beaches are broader and backed by sand dunes rather than cliffs. The food feels more traditional, but perhaps given that it was the dead of winter many restaurants were offering all kinds of stews. There are several very small fishing communities that are still highly traditional and are delightful to spend time in. Boardwalks along the waterfront are much more popular in this part of the region.

And the countryside, oh my! The almond blossoms were just coming out when I arrived and were at the peak of perfection during my visit. And there are sooo many of them. In some places, there were white and pink blossoms as far as they eye can see.

Unfortunately, there are also some depressingly overbuilt and congested tourist traps in this area too.  And it was scary to be driving the back hill country only to encounter the massive up-scale golf courses and gated housing communities that have sprung up as ugly blots on the rural landscape.  But I suppose that tourists must be attracted in whatever way possible.  Sad to see, though.

Stay tuned in the coming weeks, folks as I document my most recent discoveries.  Great art galleries, public art displays in unusual places, villages, restaurants, country drives will all be featured to help make your visit to the Algarve an amazing and rich one.  Or perhaps even to tempt you to visit this wonderful gem of a destination tucked away in the southern-most reaches of an equally delightful country.

Chillin’ in Tavira

Tavira is a delightful city in Eastern Algarve.  I love to spend the day there, exploring its many churches, alleyways, restaurants and shops.  Make sure you take the time to discover this charming place.

Click to play this Smilebox slideshow: Chillin in Tavira
Create your own slideshow - Powered by Smilebox
This free slideshow design made with Smilebox